RenaRuadh - Without music, life would Bb

The eternal problem of the apostrophe...

I have started reading a self-published book that has a really good, intriguing storyline. It would be the perfect read if it weren’t for those pesky apostrophes. Can somebody explain to me why I have to read the sentence: “...the rich locks of hair, reflecting reds and gold’s pretty as the leaves in fall.” Why on earth did the author get the first plural spot on and turn the second one into a genitive singular? Why? Where is the sense in that? Is it sloppiness? That should never happen if the author wants to be taken seriously.

Well, hurrah!

The Naughty List - L.A. Kelley

After all my lemons, finally I have found an SPA who I love, love, love! This book was fantastic. First, grammar etc were fine. But the story - oh the story! I laughed out loud, I loved the characters, I simply enjoyed this book tremendously. The concept was hilarious - the shenanigans everybody got up to and even the supposed baddie from the beginning turned out not to be so bad after all. For anybody enjoying paranormal action romance with more than just a bit of fun thrown into the mix, but also some serious notes, this is a brilliant, enjoyable book!

Have you ever been really angry at an author?

Shadow in the Pines - P.J.  Nunn

Well, I am angry at this one. I started the book after a particularly horrid self-publication and breathed a sigh of relief. The writing was good, no errors, the plot really caught me. I read till about 3/4 of the book, enjoying myself tremedously. We have a heroine who is intelligent, likeable, and who acts in a believable manner. Ditto the hero. I enjoyed reading how they grew closer, how they developed their relationship. I enjoyed the mystery - who caused the students to disappear? Where did the students disappear to? Who put the snakes in the heroine's house/office? Then came the ending and a lot of questions remained unanswered. A body is found in the cellar and we don't find out who it actually was. We never find out what happened to the students. We don't really know why they disappeared. We don't really know why somebody tries to kill Dani. We don't know why these particular people work together to kill Dani. Questions, questions, questions. It almost feels as though the author ran out of steam and couldn't be bothered to tie up all the loose ends. Where is Mike? Why/how did he disappear? I am angry at the author for ruining what could have been a truly excellent, fun read!

Musings on SPAs...

Yesterday I deleted a half-read book from my Kindle. I so wanted to stick with it, but the writing did not really grab me and then there were the other issues. The heroine was in the process of divorcing her cheating husband, her aunt had died and left her a house. Ex-hubby said since that happened while they were still married, he had a right to half the house. What does heroine do? Moan, sob, oh dear, he is probably right, I'll have to take out a loan.... Did she do the the first, logical thing and get legal advice? Heck no. 'He is probably right....'. That's when I gave up. Basta. The next book on my Kindle was an older Maggie Shayne book - The Gingerbread Man. Jeez, what a difference! It gripped me from the beginning, well-written, tense, a likeable heroine who was not TSTL...

 

Result? While I know that there are some fantastic SPAs around, I've had some real bad luck recently. A Kindle full of lemons - hah, there's a nice title....!

Punctuation, punctuation, punctuation...

I gave up...

The Lady Wore Cowboy Boots (Texas Dreams) - Christine L Stevenson

...halfway through the book. It was too painful. The story was completely contrived and over the top, utterly silly. The worst, however, was the grammar, spelling, sentences. Frequently sentences would not make sense. When I came across 'Wee' from a French modiste instead of 'Oui', I finally gave up. The mistakes are too numerous to list, 'where' instead of 'wear', 'bobble' instead of 'bauble'... The author is only semi-literate and this 'book' should have undergone severe editing for spelling, grammar and content. An absolute disaster.

Killing Memories - Tatiana Moore Hmmmm.... I'm not really sure whether I like this book or whether I don't. I'd probably give it 2 3/4 stars. The main characters are so completely over the top that they are turning into caricatures at times. Take, for example, the stalker and the heroine's mother. The stalker, as the reader finds out later, is not only schizophrenic but also has bipolar disorder and a meeting with the heroine causes him to stop taking his medication. At the same time, the mother pushes him at her daughter, who made it clear that she finds him disgusting and tries to avoid him at all costs, locking herself into the bathroom in her mother's house for 40 minutes to escape. Still, the mother tells the stalker that her daughter actually loves him.

When the mother realises that her daughter is in love with a white man - her being Mexican, she slaps her twice so hard that the heroine requires an icepack. This type of erratic behaviour just does not make sense - it is completely over the top. Similarly the attempts made by mother and auntie to matchmake and hook the heroine up with all kinds of unsuitable men.

Then, there is the behaviour of the heroine herself. She is supposedly 26 but behaves like a very young teenager. Okay, she is inexperienced as regards men, but again, the author goes way over the top in her characterisation. Moreover, I really don't understand the author's incredible fascination with people throwing up. This, unfortunately, happens for a disproportionately huge amount of time throughout the book and is described in more detail than the reader would want to know!

Finally, there are the grammatical issues, which do not endear the book to me.
Killing Memories - Tatiana Moore Hmmmm.... I'm not really sure whether I like this book or whether I don't. I'd probably give it 2 3/4 stars. The main characters are so completely over the top that they are turning into caricatures at times. Take, for example, the stalker and the heroine's mother. The stalker, as the reader finds out later, is not only schizophrenic but also has bipolar disorder and a meeting with the heroine causes him to stop taking his medication. At the same time, the mother pushes him at her daughter, who made it clear that she finds him disgusting and tries to avoid him at all costs, locking herself into the bathroom in her mother's house for 40 minutes to escape. Still, the mother tells the stalker that her daughter actually loves him.

When the mother realises that her daughter is in love with a white man - her being Mexican, she slaps her twice so hard that the heroine requires an icepack. This type of erratic behaviour just does not make sense - it is completely over the top. Similarly the attempts made by mother and auntie to matchmake and hook the heroine up with all kinds of unsuitable men.

Then, there is the behaviour of the heroine herself. She is supposedly 26 but behaves like a very young teenager. Okay, she is inexperienced as regards men, but again, the author goes way over the top in her characterisation. Moreover, I really don't understand the author's incredible fascination with people throwing up. This, unfortunately, happens for a disproportionately huge amount of time throughout the book and is described in more detail than the reader would want to know!

Finally, there are the grammatical issues, which do not endear the book to me.
Minerva's Ghost - Danielle Elise Girard Oh dear. Calling this disaster a book is being overly flattering. Besides the factual errors (an employee of a security firm will NEVER be able to obtain a search warrant - that is something only the police can do!!!), there was the abysmal writing style and finally the storyline with the characters. Starting with the characters, they were utterly shallow, one-dimensional and over the top. There was no character development whatsoever, hero and heroine fall 'in love' nearly instantly, and into bed even quicker. Now, I'm definitely no prude, but if I want to read erotica, I buy erotica. This 'book' was a disastrous hodgepodge of various different types, taking the worst out of every genre. Next, the author obviously cannot make up her mind whether one of the characters is called 'Justin' or 'Jason'. She seamlessly switches from one name to other, than back again.

I know I should stop downloading free Kindle books... but I am ever-hopeful that the next one will be great! It has happened, but, unfortunately, not with this book!!
Minerva's Ghost - Danielle Elise Girard Oh dear. Calling this disaster a book is being overly flattering. Besides the factual errors (an employee of a security firm will NEVER be able to obtain a search warrant - that is something only the police can do!!!), there was the abysmal writing style and finally the storyline with the characters. Starting with the characters, they were utterly shallow, one-dimensional and over the top. There was no character development whatsoever, hero and heroine fall 'in love' nearly instantly, and into bed even quicker. Now, I'm definitely no prude, but if I want to read erotica, I buy erotica. This 'book' was a disastrous hodgepodge of various different types, taking the worst out of every genre. Next, the author obviously cannot make up her mind whether one of the characters is called 'Justin' or 'Jason'. She seamlessly switches from one name to other, than back again.

I know I should stop downloading free Kindle books... but I am ever-hopeful that the next one will be great! It has happened, but, unfortunately, not with this book!!
Forged in Fire - Trish McCallan This book has its positive and negative aspects with the positive outweighing the negative by far. I enjoyed the story very much - the author is definitely a gifted writer. Interesting, likeable characters from the three SEALs, their misogynistic commander (whose story I'd be very interested in reading) to some very strong female characters.

Now for the criticism. First, the book did not really have a proper ending. Fair enough, cliffhangers are acceptable, but this is teasing the reader just a bit too much... I can't go into greater detail without writing spoilers, but, suffice to say, a slightly more 'rounded' ending would have been appreciated. Finally, there are the factual problems, one of which I know some other reviewers have also picked up on. You don't shoot machine guns in a plane without said plane going down. That is just one of those annoying things that take away from the enjoyment of a book. Then, one of the 'baddies' gets shot in the forehead and the throat, but he still has time to say a few words. A shot to the forehead shoule be immediately lethal and a shot to the throat will take out the voice box.

That said, I am going to buy the second instalment in the series as I definitely want to know how things continue....
Lumber and Lace - Lietha Wards Take the worst aspects out of Diana Palmer books; multiply by ten and add an unbelievable lack of knowledge of grammar and punctuation - and you will get Lietha Wards. This is my second book by this author and it will most certainly be my last. I had downloaded some of her books onto my Kindle and my computer, but after reading the first one I should have had the sense to stop torturing myself by reading another one! The rest of them will definitely be deleted unread.

In the very first line of the prologue, there are already three punctuation and grammar mistakes. Reading further down the first page, I stumbled over grammar and punctuation mistakes in just about every paragraph with the author jumping between tenses sometimes; something which sadly continued throughout the entire book. It's unbelievably painful!

We have a shy, young heroine with a background of abuse and a completely overbearing arrogant man, considerably older, who knows everthing better. For example, after finding out that the heroine is a virgin and insists on remaining one, my `favourite' quotes is: "There's no way in hell that you're going to go through life and not experience a man, Brianne. I'm obliged to introduce you to that." What a generous man, right? Of course, he has double standards as he does not want his 20 year old sister to date at all - meeting a man for coffee is absolutely unacceptable. In other scenes, he tells her to say `no' to him if she really wants him to stop. When she actually does, he responds by saying that she "has a hell of a way to say yes". Lovely man - how very romantic.

Then we have the factual nonsense. The hero hires a PI to investigate the heroine and just like that the PI obtains all her hospital records. The author has obviously never heard anything about HIPAA, the Federal health privacy law. This is so unbelievably lazy - she obviously cannot be bothered to do research - and shows a blatant disregard for potential readers' intelligence.
Smitten - Payton Lee This was probably one of the sorriest excuses for a book I've ever had the misfortune to read. The characters are such awful stereotypes and so one-dimensional that the reading experience is incredibly boring. The whole book could probably have been shortened by a good 200 pages as I swear if I had been forced to read about one more dress-shopping experience in England I would have screamed.

Then, there is the horrendous grammar and the spelling mistakes. One example out of many - the author uses 'epilates' for `epaulettes'! Now epilating is something women use to get rid of unwanted hair on their legs. Epaulettes decorate a gentleman's shoulders in military fashion. Suffice to say, the writing style is abysmal, bringing to mind mediocre school essays. The author has obviously no clue how to write indirect speech and the sentence structures are awful.

My main gripe, however, is the use of foreign language. First, part of the book takes place in Eirinn - Ireland - and the author uses what she seems to think are Irish phrases. They are, however, Scots Gaelic, a language I happen to be fluent in. She seems to have picked up certain phrases from either very bad handwriting or badly printed pages as there is an absolutely ridiculous mistake: "Clamar a tha sibh" instead of "Ciamar a tha sibh", mistaking an 'i' for an 'l'. Then, the form 'Chaluim' is actually the genetive case of the name Calum. No name in either Irish or Gaelic will be lenited in the nominative. This is followed by the absolute nonsensical form of Paul's name in Irish/Gaelic "Po'l". Where on earth does that apostrophe come from??? Next, the author uses the German word "schwanger" for pregnant in ways that are grammatically so unbelievably wrong it is painful. Dear Ms Lee, if you have no language skills, please, go to a scholar for help and don't subject readers to this painful experience!

Then there is that nonsense about Chaluim's wife being a Sasannach from Cuimrigh. Well, sorry, but "a'Chuimrigh" is Wales and if you call any Welshman English, even today, you're likely to get punched. The Welsh are Celts, themselves oppressed by the English!
Smitten - Payton Lee This was probably one of the sorriest excuses for a book I've ever had the misfortune to read. The characters are such awful stereotypes and so one-dimensional that the reading experience is incredibly boring. The whole book could probably have been shortened by a good 200 pages as I swear if I had been forced to read about one more dress-shopping experience in England I would have screamed.

Then, there is the horrendous grammar and the spelling mistakes. One example out of many - the author uses 'epilates' for `epaulettes'! Now epilating is something women use to get rid of unwanted hair on their legs. Epaulettes decorate a gentleman's shoulders in military fashion. Suffice to say, the writing style is abysmal, bringing to mind mediocre school essays. The author has obviously no clue how to write indirect speech and the sentence structures are awful.

My main gripe, however, is the use of foreign language. First, part of the book takes place in Eirinn - Ireland - and the author uses what she seems to think are Irish phrases. They are, however, Scots Gaelic, a language I happen to be fluent in. She seems to have picked up certain phrases from either very bad handwriting or badly printed pages as there is an absolutely ridiculous mistake: "Clamar a tha sibh" instead of "Ciamar a tha sibh", mistaking an 'i' for an 'l'. Then, the form 'Chaluim' is actually the genetive case of the name Calum. No name in either Irish or Gaelic will be lenited in the nominative. This is followed by the absolute nonsensical form of Paul's name in Irish/Gaelic "Po'l". Where on earth does that apostrophe come from??? Next, the author uses the German word "schwanger" for pregnant in ways that are grammatically so unbelievably wrong it is painful. Dear Ms Lee, if you have no language skills, please, go to a scholar for help and don't subject readers to this painful experience!

Then there is that nonsense about Chaluim's wife being a Sasannach from Cuimrigh. Well, sorry, but "a'Chuimrigh" is Wales and if you call any Welshman English, even today, you're likely to get punched. The Welsh are Celts, themselves oppressed by the English!

Seven Ancient Wonders

Seven Ancient Wonders - Matthew Reilly Please try to imagine reading a comic book, however, this particular comic does not have any pictures. If you are able to imagine that, you will have an idea of what this book is like.

First of all, the characters are so one-dimensional it is laughable. Also, they have been drawn so completely over the top that they have turned into caricatures. Character development? None whatsoever.

Second, one of my biggest problems was the writing. No tension build-up, no excitement, nothing. What annoyed me most, however, was the constant use of italics in the narrative to make the poor reader realise, oh, this is supposed to be exciting now! Sorry, Mr Reilly, all it does is exasperate the reader and make him/her want to actually throw the book against the nearest wall!

Third, and in true comic book style, the author describes noises: we get Crack!! Bang!! and the likes. Obviously, the author is unable to describe an action scene without reverting to these comic-style expletives.

Let's not even go to the scientific aspects.... Suffice to say that I've never seen/heard of a falcon having been trained to not only listen to its name and on command return to a pouch on the owner's chest, but also to do wondrous things like disarm whatever gadget the author could come up with!

Altogether, this is just about the most annoying book I have ever had the misfortune to read. Thankfully, I picked it up in a charity shop for a quid, hence the waste of money wasn't too great. And I did something for charity (though I'd rather have donated the money up-front than read this book...)

Stealing Innocence I

Stealing Innocence - Sylvia Hubbard I must say that the more I read of this book, the more amusing I found it. Here we have an author who can't spell using 'big words' and getting them wrong in the most hilarious way. My personal favourite is the scene where the author describes the tip of the male member as being 'bibulous'. I assume she means 'bulbous', as 'bibulous' means 'given to or marked by the consumption of alcoholic drink'. Then there is 'nativity' instead of 'naivety'. It's unbelievably funny. Next, we have the grammatical errors and incredibly bad punctuation. This 'book' is a joke and in dire need of a good editor. It is an insult to a reader.